Friday, October 7, 2011

Eat Organic Without Breaking the Bank

Reading my local paper last week I came across a story called "Organic for All" on how to eat organic food without breaking the bank. Full of useful information, included was a blurb about a class offered at the Willy Street Co-op; how to use their bulk aisle, eat well, and not spend a fortune. "No Secret to Savings" is offered at both the west and east side locations. Free to owners or $5 to non-owners, participants are lead down the bulk-food aisle where they receive introductions to new foods and tips on simply cooking strategies. I found one class, coming up on Monday, October 24th. I just may have to attend.

Why the interest in eating bulk organic? I keep reading this "frugal" stories about homemakers who clip coupons, shop the "sales" and spend $100 on their grocery bill. I wonder --what are they eating? Mac and cheese, from a box? What are the long-term health effects? This month I want to see how little I can spend, but buy eating simple, vegetable and grain based meals. In the article I mention above there is a quote from a women named Jill Richardson who does just this, and she paraphrases her style as "cheap, fast, and lazy". Can I replicate her style? Time will tell.

4 comments:

  1. That's why I almost never use grocery coupons....they don't really have coupons for fruits and vegetables!

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  2. Coupons can sometimes be found for baking and preserving supplies, and are usually seasonal. Last weekend I found $1 the yeast I use to bake bread. And I hope to use it when the product goes on sale or it's double coupon day.

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  3. I love buying in bulk. We don't like to eat processed foods or "convenience" foods mostly because they aren't all that convenient (see http://www.grist.org/article/not-much-convience-in-convenience-foods), but we also have a postage-stamp sized kitchen. It saves money and space to keep flour, sugar, and baking powder on hand rather than pancake mix, bread mixes, cake mixes, etc. A can of tomatoes can be made into pasta sauce, soup, added to beans and rice, or tossed into a stir fry at the last minute. The closer a food is to its natural state when you buy it, the more versatile, cheap, and healthy it is!

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  4. Well said Elizabeth. I joined the Willy Street Co-op over the weekend, and am registered for the class. I'm looking forward to it! Thanks for reading and commenting!

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