Friday, September 22, 2017

Harvest

What may be the most neglected garden in America today, it continues to produce a harvest.  Last Spring I put up some fencing on the south side of our house, expanding what had been a perennial bed into a vegetable garden.  We hauled some stepping stones out of a remote part of the yard, having been buried under weeds when we bought the house in late 2010, and voila, we had a path to navigate.  With shovel in hand I turned the grass over to soil, tossed in some plants from Jung Garden shop, put down a layer of newspaper topped with straw.  Tomatoes, zucchini, cucumber, and pumpkins went into the ground.  Pepper plants were relegated to pots -- I had bought more than I had space for.

The calendar pages turned, summer arrived, and I worked the busiest summer at my legal practice that I ever have since launching a solo practice in 2005.  Mother Nature had my back; gentle and frequent rains combined with cool temperatures kept the soil moist during my neglect.  And the plants put forth a harvest.   August arrived.  We left the country to visit Iceland and the same time an exterior house painting trampled all over the garden.

September has brought the heat we normally have in July.  I've watered a few times, but have really ignored the garden.  And still it produces.  Earlier this week I broiled tomatoes with sweet peppers and onion, sprinkled with salt.  Into the food processor, add some lime juice, and you have a very mild salsa.  Perfect to top a burger or plate of slow cooked pork.

2017, the year I ignored our garden and ended up with a continual harvest.  My interest in gardening has been sparked.  What might happen if I actually gave it some attention?







Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Dropping the Ball and Skipping "Enrichment" Activities

What is the saying, make a plan and then life happens?  I had a plan.  Once our son's NFL  Flag Football ended in mid-October I would sign both kids up for Sunday swim lessons at our gym.  And that would end just before the winter ice skating lessons for our daughter AND basketball league for our son.  Did I mention that the kids are only 9 and 7?

Then life happened.  The swim instructor email went out saying lessons would be on Tuesday and Thursday evenings.  Wait, what?  My hyper-active Type A planning mind froze-up.  I work late on Tuesdays and Thursday, the kids go to after school. We CANNOT due swim those nights.  This past summer the kids had swim on Tuesdays, after a full-day of summer camp, and on more than one occasion our oldest was in tears in the pool because he was being pushed so hard.  For 24 hours I asked around for recommendations.  My plan was to have them swim on Sundays.  And then the storm clouds cleared and my mind settled.

My kids are 9 and 7.  We are entering cold and flu season.  What are the chances they'll both be healthy enough to swim on Sundays in late-October to December.  What will the weather conditions be like for driving?  I may have been born with a Swedish last name (Gustafson), but I really dislike driving in snow (we live in Madison, Wisconsin -- we get snow, and ice).  And then I realized I could simply take them swimming with me at the gym.  Friday night and Saturday as well as Sunday there is "family swim", and other times we could just share a lane.  They know HOW to swim, for now we just need to keep swimming.  Lessons aren't essential.

Gone was the stress of scheduling, opening up time for the kids and I to share a way I love to stay active - swim just to swim.  I have no dreams that a swim scholarship will put them through college. Our frugal ways and devotion to funding their 529 college savings plans will pay for school.  They are not yet double-digit age and have a hefty amount tucked away for higher education.  My undergraduate and law degree are from public universities, so I don't buy into the "you have to do x, y, and z to get into the ivy league sales mania."

So I dropped the ball and found: piece of mind, more relaxed schedules, no stress of missed lessons due to illness, and more money in my budget.  Today the Washington Post ran an article on teens delayed development.  Oddly there is little to no discussion of the modern trend to "enrich" our children's lives with near constant organized activity.  Kids these days have little to no time to just play in the back yard or splash in the pool.  I'm bucking the trend with our kids and backing off of the enrichment activities more than I have in the past.  Where are you on your frugal path?

Friday, September 8, 2017

Icelandic Inspiration: Leading a Frugal Life

The upside of a frugal life is that one has funds to travel if one makes travel a priority.  And in our frugal home, travel is a top priority behind a cozy home and quality education. Five years ago the city of Reykjavik, Iceland hosted 300,000 tourists a year, in 2017 they expect 1.7 million. Recently we spent a week in the island nation of Iceland, and I left more inspired than ever to lead a frugal life given the domination of climate change in the news cycle.






While I could not read the actual story as it was in Icelandic, the headline was clear.  Even in this remote gas station in rural Iceland, Harvey caused the world to take note.  As I write this post Irma is headed to Florida, where we have extended family.  Fires out west, earth quakes, more hurricanes; denying climate change is not the path to follow!  I spend a great deal of time thinking about my children's school experience and the return on their college savings accounts.  And more than ever I think about the state of the planet will are handing to them.

Join me on my path to re-affirm a frugal life.  One that is not only easy on our planet, but good for our wallets and health.  Have you taken any new steps to off-set climate change?  I am not waiting for our elected officials to take action; I firmly believe public policy lags social norms.  Since my return from Iceland I have increased my efforts to leave my trusty Honda Civic parked in the garage, and get about without a car.  Forbes reports that parents with kids increase their carbon footprint by 6% because they "need" to use a car.  I can attest to the fact Little Americans can walk more than one might expect.  We experienced this first hand in March 2016 while traveling in Southern Sweden, going 2 weeks without a car.  And this past August in Iceland.  Granted, Northern Europe is more walker (and biker) friendly.   But I'm up for a challenge, I think I need to be given the historic storms brewing in the Atlantic.


Share your thoughts and ideas here, let's inspire and motivate one another.  Public policy will eventually catch up with us.